Atkins for Kidneys

Every day it seems a new health story hits the headlines. We have been regaled with horror stories about how salt will kill us –  while ignoring the reality that too little will do the trick nicely –  how more units of alcohol than the government approved limit will do untold damage, despite those government limits being plucked from thin air. Then we have silly government initiatives that cost millions yet serve no useful purpose other than to annoy those of us who are able to make our own lifestyle choices without nanny’s nagging. For a long time –  as long as I can recall –  fat and dairy products have been the bad boys of the food world. Too much fat clogs up the arteries –  so much so that we have had a cardiac surgeon demanding that butter be banned. And now, quietly over the course of a bank holiday weekend, we have a snippet of news that gainsays the anti-fat mantra.

A controlled diet high in fat and low in carbohydrate can repair kidney damage in diabetic mice, according to US scientists.

The study, published in journal PLoS ONE, showed a “ketogenic diet” could reverse damage caused to tubes in the kidneys by too much sugar in the blood.

Well, well, well. Yes, this is mice we are talking about and it is just another piece of research that has yet to be tried on humans –  and may not even work if it is. What amuses me though, is the constant flow of contradictory statements about what is good for us –  usually with warnings of dire consequence and death if we do not comply with the advice proffered, followed at some point by a piece of research that completely contradicts the initial warning. Now, most of us –  those who are sentient adults –  will realise that a healthy diet is likely to be a balanced one that includes a range of foodstuffs –  fats, oils, protein, fibre and carbohydrates –  because that is what our bodies need to survive. Most of us can manage perfectly well without the constant stream of health scares from vested interests. And having managed five decades ignoring government health advice, I’m still here to tell the tale. Given the level of screeching by government and its hangers-on, I am not alone in ignoring them –  while I neither drink nor smoke as others do, I like my salt and fatty foods, just as I like my dairy products –  including full cream milk. Nanny doesn’t like it. Why, oh why, do the little proles not take any notice? Why, oh why do the little people insist on making unhealthy choices, despite nanny’s health campaigns and nudges? It is, perhaps, because most of us –  despite our apparently unhealthy lifestyles –  will live longer than our grandparents did.

7 comments for “Atkins for Kidneys

  1. April 27, 2011 at 9:11 am

    “What amuses me though, is the constant flow of contradictory statements about what is good for us –  usually with warnings of dire consequence and death if we do not comply with the advice proffered, followed at some point by a piece of research that completely contradicts the initial warning.”

    That’s why I never take any heed of the latest fad – another, totally contradictory one’ll be along in a minute!

    As you say, moderation in all things is the key.

    • April 27, 2011 at 10:01 am

      Of course, by now we should all have succumbed to BSE and if not that, listeria…

      Ah, those were the days; cabinet ministers shoving burgers down their sprog’s face to make the point that they are safe :mrgreen:

  2. April 27, 2011 at 10:31 am

    There is the Dave Allen maxim, isn’t there – that sinful, ginful man lives to threescore years and ten. Even longer today. Meat, veg, fruit, grain, treats and some alcohol. Plenty of water along the way. Fine.

  3. William
    April 27, 2011 at 12:22 pm

    Ignorance is the best course of action when it comes to any ‘healthy eating’ advice from an ‘expert’. Ignoring the media entirely is a far better course of action but I do realise for some that really is a step too far!

    • April 27, 2011 at 1:08 pm

      That’s generally my approach.

  4. April 27, 2011 at 1:00 pm

    I have long since come to the conclusion that reading the contradictory barrage of media health advice is far more damaging to the mind than ignoring it is to the body.

  5. April 27, 2011 at 5:08 pm

    Gary Taubes is yer man for counter-hegemonic health food stuff.

    I don’t have the skills to judge, of course, but it does seem that people are prejudiced against fat because it’s called fat. In fact, I half suspect that I could get away with selling sugar as a “fat-free” product.

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