Amy Winehouse & Rebecca Leighton – A Double Dose of Despair?

Amy Whitehouse, died at 27 years of age, on the same day that Rebecca Leighton, 27 years of age, was charged with criminal damage with intent to endanger life, following the deaths of five patients at Stepping Hill hospital. Co-incidence perhaps, yet both youngsters surely epitomize the despair that the baby boomer generation has passed to so many of their children.

Take the words of Amy Whitehouse’s greatest hit, “They tried to make me go to rehab, I said, “ no,no,no”. Consider the press pictures of the partying Rebecca Leighton, but consider too what may have motivated her – trained as  she was as a nurse, in an environment of cost cutting and huge administrative incompetence. What was the attitude of those who should have been her role models from Stepping Hill hospital to the very peak of the NHS within succeeding Cabinets. Hypocrisy was and is the ethos of the NHS, contempt for the sick and elderly the truly sickening end result.

Was news of the evil acts emanating from Norway the final straw for Winehouse? We will never know!

Few of us who had the duty, to care for and nurture today’s younger adult generation, can examine our own lifestyles with a completely clear conscience, I would wager. What motivated Anders Behring Breivik, we shall soon, no doubt, hear in his own words. Those who should be in the dock with Rebecca Leighton, we shall never know, but let us hope, that they themselves, at least have some remaining shreds of decency and self-awareness to at least have a clue.

15 comments for “Amy Winehouse & Rebecca Leighton – A Double Dose of Despair?

  1. July 24, 2011 at 7:07 pm

    I am deeply saddened by Winehouse’s death. She was one of the few great talents of her generation and to watch the downward spiral of her life was a great shame.

    I wouldn’t try to attribute any blame anywhere, though. The addicted personality is the only one who can take control. No one else can. Indeed, attempts to do so are likely to be counter productive. Unfortunately, in this case, it was terminal before shoe was in a position to reverse matters. great, great shame.

    • Paul
      July 24, 2011 at 7:56 pm

      Longrider: I wouldn’t try to attribute any blame anywhere, though. The addicted personality is the only one who can take control. No one else can. Indeed, attempts to do so are likely to be counter productive.

      The puritans still labour under the delusion that they can fix people and they’ll like it though. Doesn’t stop them. I mean, I’m projecting here possibly, but I’ve known people that were very fat and have lost a vast amount of weight in a short space of time. They didn’t seem healthy and happy – they seemed depressed. But, according to puritan thinking, they should be ‘made’ to feel happy after being the optimal weight. This is poisonous and I really don’t think it’s down to weight, or an ‘obesity epidemic’ or any of that.

      Happiness is hard to define and it doesn’t just come down to losing weight if you’re Mr or Ms Tubby, or giving up drugs if you do them (without serious addiction issues), or giving up the ale. It’s something else.

  2. john in cheshire
    July 24, 2011 at 7:45 pm

    My sister was addicted to drugs and she died as a consequence. I recognise that only she could decide to stop. But in the intervening years; more than 20; I had the misfortune to come into contact with social workers, drug workers, housing people, the police, medical people. None of them, in my opinion can be proud of what they do in such cases. Particularly those who earn their living from the taxpayers pocket. If they are incapable, or unwilling to help then they should say so and we can stop paying them and look to other sources of assistance. But the socialist state lies to us by saying it can solve all our problems; it can’t and it doesn’t. And the arrogance of these people is something to behold. I really despise them. So, for Ms Winehouse to have died is no surprise, she may have also believed that the secular socialist state would save her. It can’t and even if it could, it won’t. The only consolation in my sister’s case is that she has left behind three wonderful children, who are intelligent and a gift to our country. No thanks to socialism.

    • July 24, 2011 at 9:52 pm

      Ah, well, when the addict really does want help, sometimes these people can be of real help. However, it must come from the addict initially. It also helps if the helper has first hand experience…

  3. Junican
    July 24, 2011 at 8:09 pm

    One cannot help but feel that the fact that drugs are illegal has many unintended consequences. Not long ago, I took my wife to the dentists. As we all know, she was asked to complete a health form. The final question was, “Do you smoke?” But I noticed that the anti has been upped somewhat with a certain subtle expression of disapproval. The staff there were not very amused when I asked where the questions were about drug taking, alcohol and aids and stuff.

    My point as regards drugs is that the fact that they are illegal inhibits any approach to the subject. Would you tell your dentist that you enjoy a line of cocaine occasionally?

    One wonders sometimes whether or not the illegality is a big part of the problem.

    Where are all the studies? Oh….drugs are illegal, so the Gov can hardly be expected to fund such studies.

    • Paul
      July 24, 2011 at 8:13 pm

      Watch as alcohol is denormalised. As it is being denormalised, I have started drinking more and more. When I drank in the pubs it was in fact less than I do now by quite a margin. As with many of us, the Internet has become the only real source of socialising in the evenings – OK, people may call me (and those like me) loners and losers but the alternatives – i.e. going out to empty pubs or pubs full of couples or scrotes – don’t hold much appeal either.

      All that happens with this kind of prohibition – indeed, any kind of prohibition – is that people that do indulge in it become increasingly frightened of becoming ‘outed’ depending on their personalities and the strength of the prohibition and societal disapproval.

    • Paul
      July 24, 2011 at 8:19 pm

      Junican: The staff there were not very amused when I asked where the questions were about drug taking, alcohol and aids and stuff.

      The repressed smirks on the faces of the people around me when I asked when the last time Atheism counted as a Religion on a form I was given at the hospital gave me a similar boost.

      • July 24, 2011 at 9:54 pm

        Why on earth would they be asking about that? And what business is it of theirs anyway? Or is that stupid question?

        • Paul
          July 24, 2011 at 10:10 pm

          Longrider: Why on earth would they be asking about that? And what business is it of theirs anyway? Or is that stupid question?

          No, it’s not a stupid question.

          The questionnaire was a mental health one. I laughed at it while the receptionist (who I knew from long ago) scowled at me. I still think it was very stupid even asking that, because that would come out during the interview anyway. It’s this obsessive collation of information that I cannot see any need for and in some circumstances could be dangerous.

          And don’t get me started on the nature of their personnel. Anna Raccoon is more right than she knows…

  4. john in cheshire
    July 24, 2011 at 10:51 pm

    I’ve been banned from posting comments on Reuters website. I don’t know why because their seemingly automated system doesn’t actually tell you.

  5. Junican
    July 25, 2011 at 2:43 am

    Yes, I think that there is a ‘collection of information’ element in these questions. I would have to admit that a couple of years ago, I would have ‘underestimated’ my tobacco consumption (deliberately), but now I ‘overestimate’ it, and I do so deliberately.

    It is extremely odd that whatever I write down in this ‘health form’, my dentist takes no notice of it whatsoever.

    I suppose that the dentist is obliged to send in these forms to the local health dept where several people complete on-line forms collating the info. Perhaps these forms are part of the statistics upon which the increase or decrease in smoking prevalence are based.

    Isn’t the whole idea comical?

    • July 25, 2011 at 5:48 am

      Yup, if the dentist doesn’t care, he’s not going to make any noise about it, but just send in the stats.

      If he – or his staff – are anti-smokers, expect a lecture!

  6. Jack Savage
    July 25, 2011 at 9:07 am

    Surely the question “Do you smoke?” asked by a dentist might have some relevance when considering my oral health, tooth colour etc?
    If the question was asked by my pedicurist I would raise an eyebrow but why would this not be a legitimate dental health question?

  7. July 25, 2011 at 9:25 am

    I’m not sure there’s a connection between these two, but I’ll miss Amy Winehouse. I’m looking forward to her third album – which has been completed, apparently.

    • July 29, 2011 at 1:56 am

      Update – the album isn’t finished. I’m gutted now.

Comments are closed.