E-books are banned as the disabled are discriminated against

From Daniel Greenfield:

THIS IS WHY WE CAN’T HAVE NICE THINGS #71

The U.S. Justice Department says it has reached a settlement with the
Sacramento Public Library over a trial program that lets patrons borrow
Barnes and Noble NOOK e-book readers.

DOJ and the National Federation of the Blind objected to the program on
grounds that blind people could not use the NOOK e-readers for
technological reasons.

I had to Google this to be sure it wasn’t a parody. It’s not. Holder’s DOJ
shook down a library to get them to stop using e-readers because the blind
can’t use them.

The Justice Department said the settlement is aimed at stopping
discrimination: β€œEmerging technologies like e-readers are changing the way
we interact with the world around us and we need to ensure that people
with disabilities are not excluded from the programs where these devices
are used,” said Assistant Attorney General Thomas E. Perez in a news
release.

I guess they’ll have to go back to plain old books. Oh wait, the blind
can’t read those either.

Can you remember when we used to laugh at the USSR?

13 comments for “E-books are banned as the disabled are discriminated against

  1. September 2, 2012 at 10:54 am

    Doesn’t technology allow for the text to be spoken – even if it does sound a little bit like Stephen Hawkin?

    This is over the parody event horizon.

    • September 2, 2012 at 11:13 am

      I would say ‘Only in America!’ but then I realise we are catching up damned fast! 😯

    • September 2, 2012 at 11:57 am

      Actually, the NOOK doesn’t have text to speech (or at least not all the models do). But still, banning all ebooks rather than getting them to switch, or at least have two makes of ebook, is stupid. But then organisations who campaign on the behalf of those who can’t be bothered or don’t care* have to really make a case to publicise their situation. Negotiation and quiet diplomacy are not their methods.

      * As in you must be a minority, I will campaign on your behalf, and it’s all free because I only take money from the taxpayer, sorry, government. I’ll only take a small salary of Β£100K.

  2. September 2, 2012 at 11:32 am

    I have known two elderly, blind people, both with computers, more technical than most home computers.

    One, from McKenzie, was a whopper, with gear sticking out of it everywhere.

    These people are so condescending and insulting, they should be fired on the spot.

  3. September 2, 2012 at 11:51 am

    Braille Kindles the answer.

    We are, as I have noted previously, truly fucked.

    • September 2, 2012 at 2:29 pm

      Actually, there is such a thing as a Braille keyboard! Unless tv spy shows have been lying to me again… πŸ˜‰

  4. Richard Carey
    September 2, 2012 at 12:04 pm

    Good to see Eric Holder taking time off his main job – supplying Mexican drug gangs with weapons via ‘Fast and Furious’.

    • September 2, 2012 at 2:29 pm

      πŸ˜†

  5. David
    September 2, 2012 at 12:34 pm

    Nobody must have anything in case someone else is missing out somewhere. All books to be outlawed as some people can’t read and it just isn’t fair!

  6. ivan
    September 2, 2012 at 5:20 pm

    I also wonder how much the end result of banning is down to the e-reader being a NOOK and not a Kindle or iPad?

  7. Greg Tingey
    September 2, 2012 at 5:50 pm

    They exist here.

    Roger Ford, of “Modern Railways” calls them: “The disabilty Taliban”

    He is correct.

    • September 2, 2012 at 11:09 pm

      I have a reasonably amusing story about the Disability/H+S Taliban. I once worked in a building with a photographic darkroom. We had a visitor form a high profile disability arts group. Nobody wanted to upset the visitor by standing up to unreasonable demands (he had a hatload of taxpayer cash to spend) This dude toured the building in a whirlwind of disapproval about floor surfaces, doors, kitchen etc and eventually came to the darkroom door. He stood outside this signposted darkroom door and loudly pronounced ‘This door is unsafe,it needs a clear vision panel for at least a third of it’s hight’ A techie shook his head and stepped forward and informed him in a voice just loud enough to embarrass, just what happens when light hits photographic materials. πŸ˜›

  8. Watchman
    September 3, 2012 at 1:19 pm

    To be fair, I doubt this can happen here. Having worked with the Disability Act, it’s clear that so long as there is access to the same materials for the disabled, the public body is doing its job fine, so it doesn’t matter if the bloody ereader is not the one they use.

    Can’t help thinking of my grandmother, who went blind, who if she had heard of this might have asked who were these idiots who thought they could deny learning to others in her name?

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