Fido And Tiddles Will Be Next…

December 14, 2012 12 Comments
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…I mean, would anyone put it past them?

The RSPCA has called for a general ban on keeping monkeys as pets after a case of animal neglect was heard by a Plymouth court.

Yes indeed. Because this idiot bought an animal he was unable to care for properly (and was rightly punished for his cruelty by our judicial system) the RSPCA seeks to ensure that no-one else – whether able or not – can own one.

What next? Well, thanks to the EU, reptiles:

The legislation could effectively ban the keeping of many common reptile and amphibian species, according to the UK’s leading governmental adviser on exotic pets.Chris Newman, of the Reptile and Exotic Pet Trade Association (REPTA), says that few reptile keepers or businesses are aware of the pending legislation, or the potentially devastating consequences it will have for traders and pet owners.

And no doubt people will applaud both these initiatives, because they have no desire for a marmoset or a Burmese python or a tree frog. And they think it’ll stop there.

But it never does, with these people. Does it?

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12 Responses to Fido And Tiddles Will Be Next…

  1. December 14, 2012 at 12:08 pm

    Yes indeed. Because this idiot bought an animal he was unable to care for properly (and was rightly punished for his cruelty by our judicial system) the RSPCA seeks to ensure that no-one else – whether able or not – can own one.

    Always was the way – ever will be.

  2. December 14, 2012 at 2:04 pm

    If those arseholes think that I’ll allow them to euthenase any of my animals, they can think again. Over my dead body.

    • December 14, 2012 at 4:23 pm

      That will suit them only too well, LR.

    • December 14, 2012 at 5:05 pm

      Over your dead body? No. Over theirs is preferable. :twisted:

      • December 15, 2012 at 12:31 pm

        :lol:

  3. Robert Edwards
    December 14, 2012 at 8:54 pm

    I would protest this most strongly, as I would protest most of the RSPCA’s activities.

    Years ago, when I was tiny (five-ish), growing up in Seremban, Malaya as a wild colonial boy, it was my habit to wake up for a widdle at around 4 a.m., after which I would head for the kitchen to raid the fridge, stepping over a medium-sized snake, which was always parked on exactly the same floor tile in front of the splendid cream-coloured, pot-bellied Westinghouse fridge/freezer. I wish I still had it. Anyway, we had a Rat Problem. My parents had tried to chase it – and it was a big bugger, at least 2 feet from nose to tail and none of us could ever catch it, not even the very fierce Sikh havildar who used to loaf about the place, expectorating loudly.

    The snake had clearly positioned itself where the warmth from the heat exchanger at the back of the fridge would give it free heat; rather clever of it, upon reflection.

    And one morning, I toddled in to find that the snake (later research suggests that it was a rock python) had rather changed shape – indeed it had a large rat-shaped bulge in its tummy. Because snakes always eat their prey head first, the pink and hairless tail of the rat was still protruding. And twitching. Creepy? Certainly; as a five-year old, I found it rather cool.

    Problem solved! The Sikh havildar – Lal Singh by name – ceremoniously removed the snake (whom I had christened ‘Joe’ and plonked him, unprotesting, in a nearby tree.

    I hope he/she/it is still well. Apparently, they live a long time.

  4. Robert Edwards
    December 14, 2012 at 8:55 pm

    Years ago, when I was tiny (five-ish), growing up in Seremban, Malaya as a wild colonial boy, it was my habit to wake up for a widdle at around 4 a.m., after which I would head for the kitchen to raid the fridge, stepping over a medium-sized snake, which was always parked on exactly the same floor tile in front of the splendid cream-coloured, pot-bellied Westinghouse fridge/freezer. I wish I still had it. Anyway, we had a Rat Problem. My parents had tried to chase it – and it was a big bugger, at least 2 feet from nose to tail and none of us could ever catch it, not even the very fierce Sikh havildar who used to loaf about the place, expectorating loudly.

    The snake had clearly positioned itself where the warmth from the heat exchanger at the back of the fridge would give it free heat; rather clever of it, upon reflection.

    And one morning, I toddled in to find that the snake (later research suggests that it was a rock python) had rather changed shape – indeed it had a large rat-shaped bulge in its tummy. Because snakes always eat their prey head first, the pink and hairless tail of the rat was still protruding. And twitching. Creepy? Certainly; as a five-year old, I found it rather cool.

    Problem solved! The Sikh havildar – Lal Singh by name – ceremoniously removed the snake (whom I had christened ‘Joe’ and plonked him, unprotesting, in a nearby tree.

    I hope he/she/it is still well. Apparently, they live a long time.

  5. Steve Brown
    December 14, 2012 at 10:01 pm

    I’ve got ten chooks in the pen in my garden, in another week they’ll be right for slaughter, just like the other mobs which I’ve raised. Beautiful meat, no additives etc. and they freeze beautifully. The six rabbits I’m feeding take a bit longer to fatten but they’ll soon be ready for the pot (or freezer).
    I’m not cruel, I look after the welfare of my stock, I keep them well fed and watered, their accommodation is cleaned regularly. Why? Because I’m going to eat them.
    Now tell me that I’m an animal abuser. I dare you.

    • Twenty_Rothmans
      December 15, 2012 at 1:55 pm

      You are making me salivate. Are you a fellow Australian? I don’t hear chook over here too much.

      I like to think that the animals that have been killed for my pleasure have led happy, carefree existences. I usually buy from a farmer’s market. The man on the meat stand is a Kiwi who drinks at my local. He assures me that whatever I buy has had a happier life than I.

      He is probably right, with a Kiwi around, their sex lives must be fantastic. :twisted:

  6. Andrew
    December 14, 2012 at 10:37 pm

    I’d imagine the real end goal is not cats and dogs but children.

    • December 15, 2012 at 12:31 pm

      Oh, indeed…

  7. December 14, 2012 at 11:34 pm

    Will the NSPCC be banning the bearing and keeping of children?

    Might be for the best though. Just let’s all die out.

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