Ken Craggs on The East India Company

Ken is a canny operator who occasionally pops up with something he’s researched and regulars would know he loads his articles with links, not so much weaving a tale as providing copious evidence for what he says.

This is his latest:

I recently did this blog-post regarding the East India Company, Company of Royal Adventurers, Royal African Company, Slavery, Opium and other stuff.
 
“An Act for Encourageing of Coynage” (1666) is the legislation that transferred control over the issuance of money from the crown
into the corporate hands of the East India Company and goldsmiths. It became perpetual legislation in 1769 during the reign of George III.
 
The East India Company is still trading today, but was supposedly dissolved on 1 January 1874 as a result of the East India Stock Dividend Redemption Act 1873. However, it would seem that the latter Act was overturned by The British Statutes (Application To India) Repeal Act, 1960. < See 57.

For those not historically minded, this might seem a bit of world history one could get in a history book at school. Not likely – the EIC was a nasty organization and they talk not much about it, especially not of its heirs today.

But there they are, doing the same sort of thing in pastures new.