Fruit labels show the decline in commercial art

First of all, do you consider that this artwork:

fruit-crate-labels

… is superior to this?

current-day-labels

Because if not, then this post has no valid argument. Please don’t count retro recreations of vintage labels, I mean the generic labels now, often attached to the individual items of fruit themselves.

Is the modern artist less capable or is it that companies no longer care about making something attractive? Or is it that they care in America but not here?

Also, look at the sort of artwork whenever the government launches a new programme to waste taxpayer money:

childish-govt-posters

First move is always to the infantilized, the childish, on the grounds that this means friendly and vibrant. Contrast that with the first thought in the vintage labels – to have the most enticng, quality artwork possible.

And it’s not the cost of the artwork – we know how much all the competitions and eventual selections cost – they could have engaged an artist with a remit to emulate vintage artwork and there it would be. In fact it is done today – in google images, there were many doing retro vintage.

So it actually comes down to the same minds who run posters about Refugees Welcome. Even good organizations such as Manif go for these bold stroke, no finesse posters:

manif-banner

I’m not knocking the sentiment but surely the French can do better than that – remember, they are urging a return to traditional values – but it seems, not traditional art.

Personally, I find all that depressing, dismaying, bland, colourless, without soul, all those things. Why? Common Purpose is blamed for many things, Them are, but this is not just them directing this mediocrity – it’s people embracing it and thinking this is the modern way to represent things in graphics. Who is teaching these graphic designers?

Voila:

Poster produced for London & North Eastern Railway in conjunction with ButlinÕs Holiday Camps to promote rail travel to Skegness in Lincolnshire. The poster shows an action-packed view of a throng of people enjoying themselves in and around a huge swimming pool at ButlinÕs Camp, with a water feature and man beating a drum in the foreground. Artwork by E Oakdale. Dimensions: 1016 mm x 1270 mm.

Poster produced for London & North Eastern Railway in conjunction with Butlin’s Holiday Camps to promote rail travel to Skegness in Lincolnshire. The poster shows an action-packed view of a throng of people enjoying themselves in and around a huge swimming pool at Butlin’s Camp, with a water feature and man beating a drum in the foreground. Artwork by E Oakdale. Dimensions: 1016 mm x 1270 mm.

Q.E.D.

[H/T Chuckles]

2 comments for “Fruit labels show the decline in commercial art

  1. Henry Kaye
    October 22, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    I ignore advertising to the best of my ability.

  2. Ed P
    October 22, 2016 at 3:09 pm

    The increased use of pictures to identify produce is partly because an increasing proportion of ‘mer’cans cannot read or write. That’s also why fast-food outlets have pictures of their “food”.

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