Flooding, incompetence and politics

Churchmouse wrote:

Aerial views of Houston reservoirs and all surrounding areas are very bad. The reservoirs are over-topping and will continue to over-top in areas above and below the reservoirs …

USACE says this area now a “flood pool” because nothing’s draining. There is nowhere for the water to go because the ground is totally saturated and all streams, rivers and ponds where normal storm drainage would take place, are all full.

Even worse, lakes are also backing up into the area and flowing over their banks. At least 48 hours before any drainage will start to occur because culverts are washing — out roads are washing out.

I replied:

No one is saying nature and topography aren’t the main, predictable culprits but there is also promoting people way beyond their level of competence for political, usually feminazi reasons.

Missouri floods caused by parachutism

Similar motif in Britain with the Somerset Levels:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2014/feb/09/somerset-floods-people-feel-abandoned

In Queensland, long, long ago, they took a different approach:

Call them racists and homophobes but they thought, way back then, that on low-lying ground, near the sea and in a zone where there are cyclones/hurricanes, it was a good idea to raise the houses and let it flow under.

Houston city fathers did not see it that way and as we’ve just seen – they were right and the idiots in Queensland were not. Anyone hear of the Great Queensland Flooding Disaster?

Well actually … yes. Seems they’re all as bad as each other, these ‘city fathers’:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010%E2%80%9311_Queensland_floods#Criticism

It appears that conventional wisdom led to the building of stilt houses, rather than any foresight by planners.

7 comments for “Flooding, incompetence and politics

  1. Hereward Unbowed.
    August 31, 2017 at 11:30 am

    Houston is built on alluvial deposits, ie flood prone land, short of some massive civil engineering projects and raising buildings up, I am not sure at all that 4′ maybe 5′ of water dumped on a relatively ‘small’ area could be managed,
    Of course, the mainly but not exclusively ‘commiecrats’ ignoratti are claiming it’s all mankinds fault – well it is in a way, the idiot who founded a town on the bend of a river near a couple of Bayous needs retrospectively suing.

    It is easy to be an expert.

    I hope that, the people of Houston can reclaim their lives with the minimum of fuss but sure as sh*t they need to be asking questions about long term policies pursuant to demanding some major flood defence initiatives and not least stick vulnerable houses on stilts if needs be [cars another problem]. Or moving people out of the area to the north and west of the city, preferably where the topography is more suitable to keeping dry.

    • August 31, 2017 at 12:58 pm

      Cheers – let me add Ken Craggs’s comment:

      Houston’s devastating flood of 1935
      http://www.houstonchronicle.com/local/bayou-city-history/article/Houston-s-devastating-flood-of-1935-6293100.php

      The ‘Labor Day’ Hurricane (category 5) which hit Florida Keys in 1935 is the most intense Hurricane on record to have hit mainland United States and had the lowest barometric pressure ever recorded over land in North America (26.35 inches of Hg or 892 Mb).
      See page 13 http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/nws-nhc-6.pdf
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1935_Labor_Day_hurricane#Records
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1935_Atlantic_hurricane_season#Hurricane_Three

      The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 was the deadliest hurricane to ever hit the U.S. and caused 8000 – 12000 deaths
      https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/news/features/sep13/galveston.html

    • August 31, 2017 at 1:45 pm

      ‘ … sure as sh*t they need to be asking questions about long term policies pursuant to demanding some major flood defence initiatives and not least stick vulnerable houses on stilts if needs be [cars another problem]. Or moving people out of the area to the north and west of the city, preferably where the topography is more suitable to keeping dry.’

      Agree that a solid, long-term plan needs to be developed then executed. They have floods there every two years on average, but Houston mayors don’t seem to want to do anything about it.

      • Hereward Unbowed.
        August 31, 2017 at 1:54 pm

        DJT should make it his calling, sort Houston’s local councillors out and initiate an enormous civil engineering effort – not easy but could be done.

        Next question who’ll get to pay and national and local is the answer -[ha, ha, ha?] maybe.

        Politics, money, peoples livelihoods – there is no easy answer. I know what I’d do, simple, if I lived in Houston, I’d move out, the Rockies ain’t so far away.

  2. September 1, 2017 at 3:01 am

    Long term planning eh? I wonder what housing architecture is being mooted to deal with Yellowstone erupting.

    • Hereward Unbowed.
      September 1, 2017 at 8:15 am

      L’homme propose, Le Dieu dispose.

      Campi Flegrei, or Katla, Grimsvotn, Hekkla – goes up, all bets are off.

  3. September 1, 2017 at 1:54 pm

    Cheers again.

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